Published: Sun, June 03, 2018
Health Care | By Edgar Pierce

Arkansas Death in Multistate E. coli Outbreak Linked to Romaine Lettuce

Arkansas Death in Multistate E. coli Outbreak Linked to Romaine Lettuce

The growing season there ended six weeks ago, and it's unlikely any tainted lettuce is still in stores or people's homes, given its short shelf life. The warning is no longer in effect as the contaminated lettuce from the Yuma, Arizona, growing region is no longer harvested. The new CDC report announces four more deaths - one in Arkansas, two in Minnesota and one in NY. In a June 1 advisory, the agency said that four additional deaths were reported in Arkansas, North Carolina and NY in addition to the original death in California. That being said, the CDC continues to investigate the outbreak and warned that new cases from May could still come to light due to a three-week lag in reporting.

Officials said that first illness began sometime between March 13 and May 12.

Of the total 187 patients for whom information was available, 89 (or 48 per cent) were hospitalised, including 26 who developed a type of kidney failure called hemolytic uremic syndrome.

In an update Friday, health officials said 25 more cases raised the total to 197 illnesses in 35 states, including MI.

Trump to rally in Tennessee, where crucial Senate race looms
Blackburn, who has already received the president's endorsement, has been counting down the days on Twitter until Trump shows up. In his final year in the Senate, Corker has called Bredesen a friend and said he won't actively campaign against him.

Officials urge anyone who thinks they may be ill with an E. coli infection to see their doctor. Some said they did not eat romaine lettuce but were in close contact with someone who got sick after eating it.

Meanwhile, government authorities are still trying to figure out how and why the outbreak happened. Gottlieb is Commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and Ostroff is FDA's Deputy Commissioner for Foods and Veterinary Medicine.

The outbreak is the largest in the United States since 2006, when spinach tainted with a similar strain of E. coli sickened more than 200 people.

Like this: